Academic Results

Bridge International Academies pupils outperform their peers in neighborhood schools. Download our white paper on the Bridge Effect here to read about our gains in detail.

Academic-v3

At Bridge International Academies we use the Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) and Early Grade Math Assessment (EGMA) to evaluate our pupils’ performance.  These exams test reading and math comprehension on both a concrete and conceptual level.  These foundational skills are extraordinarily important as they are critical to the learning potential of every child.  We conduct these exams annually across a sample of thousands of pupils from Bridge International Academies and neighbouring schools, using a third-party assessment firm that specialises in EGRA/EGMA.

In our last study, we compare pupils in Pre-Unit to Class 2 in 2011 to pupils in Classes 2 through 4 in 2013 in the exact same schools.  We found that attending Bridge had a significant effect on learning.  Compared to their peers attending public schools, Bridge pupils on average gained an additional.32 standard deviations on reading fluency and comprehension over the course of 26 months.  For reading fluency, this translates into a gain of 16 words per minute, above and beyond the growth experienced by their academic peers.  Bridge’s average reading effect size of .32 translates into almost 252 additional days of learning.  The Bridge effect size for maths is also significant – both on a practical and statistical level – at .51 standard deviations, which translates into over 288 additional days of learning.

We also examined a sub-sample of pupils whom we were able to follow over the course of 26 months.  Given these pupils’ incoming skill and ability levels, we found that Bridge pupils on average gained an additional .58 standard deviations on reading fluency and comprehension.  This translates into a gain of over 20 words per minute for reading fluency.  The Bridge effect size for more advanced maths using the tracked sub-sample is also significant at .47 and .48 standard deviations for subtraction and word problems, respectively.